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Hart Crane: Criticism and Reviews

Modern American Poetry features Crane's works and links to criticism.

"Falling Shadows" an article by Tom Robbins, Daily News staff writer.

The New York Times features links to reviews of Crane's books and other sites.

Additional criticism and review of Hart Crane 's works can be found at your local public library.

The following reviews can be accessed online only by an individual who has a current library card through this address.

"Hart Crane: Overview."
Critic: John Heath-Stubbs.
Reference Guide to American Literature, 3rd ed., edited by Jim Kamp, St. James Press, 1994.

"It is difficult to give a final and objective estimate of Hart Crane's place as a poet. He is important, on more than one count, for what he set out to do, but critics have differed widely as to his actual achievement. Furthermore, there is the legend, as we may call it, of…"

"The Bridge: Overview."
Critic: Edward Halsey Foster.
Reference Guide to American Literature, 3rd ed., edited by Jim Kamp, St. James Press, 1994.

"In his essay 'Modern Poetry' (1930) Hart Crane argued that '...unless poetry can absorb the machine, i.e., acclimatize it as naturally and casually as trees, cattle, galleons, castles and all other human associations of the past, then poetry has failed of its full contemporary function.' In fact Crane seems to have done more than simply 'acclimatize'…"

"Our Modern Sensibility."
Critic: Brother Antoninus.
Commonweal (copyright © 1962 Commonweal Publishing Co., Inc.; reprinted by permission of Commonweal Publishing Co., Inc.), October 26, 1962, pp. 111-12.

"When Crane writes of the bridge (in The Bridge), he is not discounting the symbol of the bridge as the ancients saw it, but rather subsuming their symbolic reference into his own discernment, and extending that symbolic reference to…"

"A Discussion of 'At Melville's Tomb.'
Critic: Richard Strier.
Critical Inquiry, Vol. 2, No. 1, Autumn, 1975.

"… Like Keats, Crane believed that the poet must have 'an extraordinary capacity for surrender.' 'Partial surrender to the seeming accidents of language' is the essence of Crane's poetics. And Crane did not want the associations produced by these surrenders to be arbitrary and purely personal; he wanted them to be, in his terms…"

"The Bridge: Too Impossible An Ambition?"
Critic: Warner Berthoff.
Hart Crane: A Re-Introduction, University of Minnesota Press, 1989, pp. 83-109; 121-23. Reprinted in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism, Vol. 80.

In this essay, "Berthoff uses other criticism and Crane's own correspondence to evaluate the success or failure of The Bridge."

"The Success of Failure: Hart Crane's Revisions of Whitman and Eliot in The Bridge."
Critic: Susan M. Schultz.
Source: South Atlantic Review, Vol. 54, No. 1, January, 1989, pp. 55-70. Reprinted in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism, Vol. 80.

In this essay, "Schultz considers the use Crane made of the works T. S. Eliot and Walt Whitman in writing The Bridge."

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